EuroFront 2 at ConsimWorld Expo 2008

EuroFront

EuroFront

Two ‘tables’ of EuroFront2 were actively played throughout MonsterCon. The ‘newbie’ game (initially under the guidance of designer Craig Besinque) stayed “on the rails” and therefore eventually came down to the Russian steppes, where the Germans were decisively stalled in S41 well short of the historical advance. With the resulting Production advantage, the Russians pushed the Germans back to the Carpathian Line by S43, obtaining a concession shortly thereafter. The ‘grognard’ table began with a ‘prequel’ game of the Spanish Civil War, which carried through to Sept/39 without a decision (Franco held only the populated south, but enough to prevent Foreign Recognition of a Republican win). This triggered the ‘SCW Carryover’ rules and had a profound influence on the EuroFront game that followed. Under the carryover rules, the SCW continues as a sideshow (with neither power requiring National Supply) until someone Declares War on either side, whereupon the 2 sides join the Allies and Axis respectively as normal Minor Powers (which DO require National Supply).

This development is bad news for Franco, as British/French naval power normally cut him off from Berlin and he will quickly fade. The good news for him is that the Allies cannot Declare War on neutrals until Phony War ends (usually with the German attack in the West), and of course the Axis will not trigger this unfavorable development. The result was that after the Poland/Scandinavian preliminaries, as the battle of France raged the Allies did Declare War on Franco, and his rapid defeat left the victorious red Republicans (with several supporting blue blocks) in control of Spain as French Armistice was negotiated. As red and blue blocks rushed to defend the Pyrenees frontier, Germany contemplated the prospect of Balkan/Russian campaigns with a major Allied bridgehead on the continent. Instead, a major counter-buildup on the Spanish border was followed in the fall by a major effort against Red Spain which enjoyed extremely good fortune, quickly breaking through weak units defending the mountain barrier and isolating the stronger forces defending the coastal rail lines while taking Barcelona (which secured Axis supply until the rail lines were cleared). A quick thrust to Madrid also succeeded and another to Cadiz, preventing British reinforcements from reaching Gibraltar. Meanwhile the Vichy were pressed to join the Axis (by DE) and captured Tangiers from the south, further weakening Gibraltar. Mud halted operations for the Winter while the Allies attempted but failed to Mobilize the Soviets against Rumania while the Axis main force was in southern Spain. In spring Gibraltar quickly fell to a massive German attack (opening up the supply tap for the Med Front) and Germany began rapidly transferring units east to the Balkans, ending Soviet Mobilization attempts. Yugoslavia fell easily but the Axis wasted too much time taking Greece and the British fell back unscathed behind Suez with a maxed out 8th army, wisely refusing to meet Rommel in the field with 2 extra units shipped from Europe. Rommel’s attack over the canal was decisively repulsed and the Allies also buttressed their defense of E Africa. This fascinating and unique EuF2 game prompted a modification of the Turkey Cooperates DE allowing this DE to occur when Suez is Axis (expelling the Royal Navy from the E Med), allowing the Axis a ‘back door’ entry by a few units (the MF Expeditions normally used vs Torch) railed through Turkey to support ME Rebellions. The narrative being that with the RN locked out of the Med and the Germans stalemated at the canal by 8A, the Axis offers Turkey the return part of its former ME empire (Syria, Iraq, etc), for simply allowing German rail transit without its having to commit troops to the effort, and Turkey eventually buys into this logic (DE dieroll of 1). As both sides had committed to a MF campaign without this provision, rather than continue the game or try to reconstruct play to match this revision, the last day of play was devoted to SCW games and several playtests of the new “War In Our Time” what-if scenario involving Czech resistance at the time of Munich (Sept/38). It all starts with a series of Alliance Reactions, as the world finds out who supports Czechoslovakia and who doesn’t, and what other nations jump into the war as a result. In one game no Allies initially supported Czechoslovakia (a “French Honor” DE eventually brings in France and Russia if the Czechs can hold on), in another a chain reaction involving practically every nation in Europe occurred, creating major problems for Germany. Poland’s reaction is key: it can to join the Axis for a piece of Slovakia, but if Rumania comes in for the Allies it is also a longshot to join that side (Poland did have alliance ties to Rumania). If both Rumania and Poland remain neutral, Russia is helpless to aid the Czechs –- it has no way to get there. MonsterCon, at 5 days, is a perfect venue for EuroFront2, as the full campaign game plays out in about that time (60 hours). It is also a super venue and a super convention put on by John Kranz. Many, many famous designers and publishers of the game world attend and play. Highly recommended.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *