vmi1983
Rating: 10
I love this game. It's what a block game should be: Low block count, easy rules, fast playing game of maneuver, and re-playable. Great job CG!
Shaynerichards72
Rating: 9.5
Plays quick, has a lot of changing strategies, a really enjoyable game that has a bit of the best of everything from a lot of other Columbia games.
LarsG
Rating: 9
Great game. Beautiful map. Interesting topic. Challenging and plays quickly.
Unfortunately, the rules are quite vague and seems to take for granted that the players understand what the designer intended; in short: they are somewhat muddled.
atavachron
Rating: 9
My first blocks wargame. The system itself is very simple yet evocative. I love the operationnal scale in this game, and the plot : davy crockett, alamo, santa anna, indians...lovely !
The game is asymetric, and is kind of cat and mice once the US army enters the game, as the cat. During play we listened to early ZZ Top's albums, which adds evocative!
Belisarius88
Rating: 9
My first Columbia game. I was not enamored of Hammer of the Scotts, although I do consider it to be a good game. This topic interests me though so I decided to give Columbia a second chance to impress me. I still don't like the cards, but somehow quality issues don't seem to bother me. My overall impression is that the game looks good and I'm looking forward to playing. I can see myself buying the other games in this system (HoS, CR, A&S) if I find myself enjoying Texas Glory.

Update: It seemed a bit more complicated that Richard III but I like my first game, which was the full campaign.

Last Update: I am thoroughly enjoying the game although there are several rule issues that have required clarifications and balancing adjustments. Please see my review of the game.
simply4est
Rating: 9
Seems like an excellent remake of a game I liked before - Texas Revolution.
mdollin
Rating: 9
Cracking little game. Lots of feel and choices, won equally as Texan and Mexican, though the combined game seems to favour the mexicans as texans never seem to do as well as they did in 1835, and then they're all over the shop for Santa Anna's revenge. Still lost as Texans last time just because my regrouped Texan army was undone ina revenge for the actual San Juan- opponent held the surprise attack card.
Lobo2
Rating: 9
Good wargame that can be comfortably played in an evening. Not as in depth as some of the other Columbia games but is very well balanced between depth of play and time invested.
airjudden
Rating: 9
The [thing=3685][/thing] system applied to the Texas Revolution. The big difference is that a turn is 1 week, so you have 3 cards in your hand at all times, and you play 1 card per turn: go through move/combat phase, supply check, and then draw a replacement card, so it takes on a different feel than the wash-rinse-repeat Hammer system.
Playing-wise, it is more asymmetrical than [thing=6719][/thing]. Mexico is powerful, but has to act VERY quickly, which means taking chances and being reckless while conquering and garrisoning along the way.

Just a superb game with tight play and great balance.
ForestRunner
Rating: 9
Very under-rated wargame and one of Columbia Games' best. Playable with the version of the rules as originally released. Some minor tweaks in v1.01 transformed an exceptional offering into a perfect one.

Rules light, plays quick, high replayability potential, flows well, and comes with three possible scenarios - 1835, 1836 and the Full Campaign. Fun & enjoyable, and one doesn't have to be a subject matter expert on the Texas Revolution - what more can you want?
phormio
Rating: 9
I think Columbia has a winner this time. Tight, balanced, not overly complex, and quick playing. I've seen several games come down to (literally) the last battle of the last turn. The 1835 scenario seems fairly balanced and is interesting in it's own right, but the 1836 scenario is the star. Fast moving with several apparent strategies for both sides. And it plays fast enough to allow you to try out a couple of different strategies in one sitting. Haven't tried the linked "campaign", but I'm eager to. A great effort!
---
I kicked TG up half a point after a solo play of the linked campaign. Once again, victory was not secured until the last turn. Outstanding!
ericleesmith
Rating: 8
Texas Glory is a fine block game, simple, fun, and with enough twists to make it interesting. I was impressed with how asymmetrical the two sides are: one big and lumbering with supply problems, the other smaller, quicker, but brittle and with too much to do. Recommended. I may raise my rating after another play or two.
janos_hunyadi
Rating: 8
After 1 play. Columbia Games has produced many games with a very similar style in the past few years: Hammer of the Scots, Crusader Rex, Liberty, Athens & Sparta, Richard III. Although Texas Glory also combines the old Columbia standards with the card-driven mechanism first seen in HoTS, it stands out from the other games in terms of style. Texas Glory seems more focussed, resulting in a shorter game that delivers a highly concentrated dose of gaming tension.
fubar awol
Rating: 8
A fine little block game. Fairly simple but a good number of exceptions and special cases. The 1836 scenario feels like "Battle of the Bulge" (Mexicans pouring over the border and Texans playing a delay/harass action).
lmjarl
Rating: 8
Great enter level block game!
airjudden
Rating: 8
The [thing=3685][/thing] system applied to the Texas Revolution. The big difference is that a turn is 1 week, so you have 3 cards in your hand at all times, and you play 1 card per turn: go through move/combat phase, supply check, and then draw a replacement card, so it takes on a different feel than the wash-rinse-repeat Hammer system.
Playing-wise, it is more asymmetrical than [thing=6719][/thing]. Mexico is powerful, but has to act VERY quickly, which means taking chances and being reckless while conquering and garrisoning along the way.

Just a superb game with tight play and great balance.
Tushratta
Rating: 8
Good game, though I haven't figured out all the nuances of play. Worth playing again and again.
Tsaar
Rating: 8
Texas versus Mexico? Allright, American history is not quite my cup of tea. Let's play:
The map gives the Mexicans some logistical problems, which is good since their armies vastly outnumber the Texans. Leaders really add a strategic challenge compared to Hammer and Crusader, which are comparable games. Of course dice and card luck play significant roles, but Texas Glory makes for a very enjoyable game, playable in one evening. The latter becomes more and more important to me.
steveyz
Rating: 8
Good game. I like the small amount of blocks in 1835, also the fact it plays fast. Players can easily get a couple games played in an evening, (if you're not one of those players that gets hypnotized by looking at the board).

A couple minor changes in the posted 1.01 rules. looks like good common sense changes very minor, and clairifications are all, and not many, (so far) This is a fun game IMO. A definite for all those that like block games. Besides, it's cool to have Davey Crocket, and Jim Bowie at the Alamo. "Remember the Alamo!"
cfarrell
Rating: 8
First impressions - and I'm learning not to trust first impressions of Columbia games, since they've had a lot of finishing problems of late - are still pretty positive. The situation is quite asymmetric, the game plays quickly, and there are very different tensions for the Texans and the Mexicans. A little early to tell, but Columbia might be getting back on track on this one, after the intriguing gameplay but serious balance problems out of the box for Crusader Rex and especially Athens vs Sparta.
Steeledragon
Rating: 8
This is a really good game, a lot of fun in 2 hours!
Ron D
Rating: 8
The more I play the more I enoy this game. The card mechanic is one of the slicker systems with a 3 card hand, play and draw, system that keeps track of time automatically. And of course Carl is great in his active support of the game.
elijah234
Rating: 8
Another winner from Columbia Games. Good points are that game time is short, simple rules and both sides face very different and interesting tactical conditions. The strategic situation seems quite constrained though.
gittes
Rating: 8
Very balanced and enjoyable game on a topic rarely covered and one I'm not very interested in (all that don't mess with Texas stuff annoys me). Options are a bit limited in terms of maneuver, and I think there are better block games, but this one stacks up admirably to its brothers because it has an interesting mix of units and some good supply rules. This is probably the Columbia Game that comes closet to being a CDG in the We the People tradition, although it really isn't one.
randywilburn
Rating: 8
I really enjoyed this game and the theme is very well done.
Philipp Klarmann
Rating: 8
Grows on me more and more. Excellent little block game and despite some critics, is well replayable and even balanced with the extra-draw rule. 1836 shines.
Jack Hearn
Rating: 8
needs a serious rules re-write.....as do most of CG's games. Love the subject so I overlook the murky rules.
Walt Mulder
Rating: 7.8
A perfect block game covering the Alamo, and everything before and after.
Brian Sinclair
Rating: 7.5
Rules could really use some clarifications and some better examples. Enjoyable game with some interesting changes, especially sieges.
Jan van der Laan
Rating: 7.5
Another good looking, great CG blockgame!
Tiruvor
Rating: 7.5
Great implementation of the CG system. I really enjoy the asymmetrical forces and their respective challenges.
Tsaar
Rating: 7
Texas versus Mexico? Allright, American history is not quite my cup of tea. Let's play:
The map gives the Mexicans some logistical problems, which is good since their armies vastly outnumber the Texans. Leaders really add a strategic challenge compared to Hammer and Crusader, which are comparable games. Of course dice and card luck play significant roles, but Texas Glory makes for a very enjoyable game, playable in one evening. The latter becomes more and more important to me.
Andy Parsons
Rating: 7
A likeable addition to the Hammer of the Scots/Crusader Rex/Liberty family of games.

The 1836 scenario presents asymmetric forces, with the Mexican dashing to grab victory towns in time to stave off revolt back home. The difficulties of command control, supply and terrain make this less straightforward than it first appears. The Texan must pick his battles very carefully, avoid getting outflanked, and possibly make better use of sea movement than I did.

On early acquaintance, the game seems fairly well balanced. There appears some scope for alternative strategies. The cards also add some variability.

The version 1.01 rules is about the most complete and well written set I've seen from Columbia. The map artwork will win no prizes, but it is fairly functional. My only gripe is that the little dots that represent fords and ferries could have been easier to distinguish.
apuleio
Rating: 7
Simple enough to be not boring. Good for beginners or for a pause after harder games. But... can Mexicans win?
erik2point0
Rating: 7
the game itself is fun, but the board is ugly and the rules still need revision
kvezner
Rating: 7
Good block game in Columbia Games style. Rules vague re when blocks must reveal themselves while moving, but found it easy to house rule probable intent. Hexside limits for attacks and retreats add complexity, but easy enough to learn. Turns are fast, game is fast and appears to simulate the conflict well. Fun, replayable. Seiges like the Alamo become a minigame, so they have their proper weight without slowing down the overall game. Good design.
leegb1
Rating: 7
Rating for solo play only.
odd_texan
Rating: 7
Steven and I have played it five times, from either side. The Texians won every time. So why is it so much fun to be Santa Anna?
red_herring
Rating: 7
Another great block game... not as balanced as Hammer or Liberty, but solid... eager to play the Texans after winning quickly with the Mexicans in the first effort
russ
Rating: 7
Relatively simple member of the block game family. Rules are mostly clear. Texans need to fall back as the Mexicans advance. Seems to take a couple hours. After a long hiatus from Columbia block games, this is the first one I've played in years. EastFront's still the best and classic. But I give Texas Glory bonus points for being about Texas history, since I'm from Texas. :)

I made the [[Texas Glory FAQ]].
alexisW
Rating: 7
The 8 pages of rules left us with some questions. When we read BGG rules discussion, we have some answers answered. But still some lacking.

The scenario campaign game left us with questions right from the start. But once we got through to which are 1835-36 units, it becomes slightly clearer.

The game play is pretty simple. But unlike HoS, Crusaders, and such. It has its own variant in the As and Bs and Cs.

Overall, the game is simple with low number of blocks and even steps. Making this game a fast and furious manoeuvre and dicing game.

Cannot comment on historical value. But besides the rule book, the game seem reasonably fun. It does have its left and right flow to the whole game.
Steeledragon
Rating: 7
This is a really good game, a lot of fun in 2 hours!
Eldard
Rating: 7
Block game
shangrila44
Rating: 7
I played once with the Mexicans and won easily. It seemed unbalanced but I will have to try again. Historical flavor is ok but I had more fun playing Hammer of the Scots.
matthiske
Rating: 6.9
Rule book is the worst I have seen from Comumbia Games.
Lothartvni
Rating: 6.8
My first experience with Block wargames. I enjoyed it but I enjoy anything Texas so there you go. There are definite strategies you need to figure out for each side if you're going to pull it off. Texas is outnumbered and outgunned often but the Mexicans timetable is so short that it pretty much evens out.
The Berserker
Rating: 6.5
(Very) light but enjoyable...
Varus
Rating: 6.5
I still haven't figured out how to do well at this; it calls for a great deal of rushing as there isn't much time to accomplich what you need to in each scenario. One side effect though is that it's a fast-playing wargame, good for when there isn't much time.
shangrila44
Rating: 6.5
I played once with the Mexicans and won easily. It seemed unbalanced but I will have to try again. Historical flavor is ok but I had more fun playing Hammer of the Scots.
cadavaca
Rating: 6
An interesting dynamic for a block game, with the Texans constantly falling back. I gather it's a smaller incarnation of EastFront.
mummykitty
Rating: 6
Played at Conquest 2010. Our game was a slogging match, but it was the first real time we played.
Stuka
Rating: 6
SE VENDE
30€
Harae
Rating: 6
Okay: Texmex War - Operational - Easy

Plus:
-Leaders play a crucial role
-Gameplay is quick
-Nice swings of fortune; the cards ensure for a variety.
-Sides play completely different
-Nice variety of things in only 5 pages of rules; non complex and almost dive in and play.
-Very accessible, exciting gameplay

Minus:
-A mutant block here and there so watch out where you put a sticker on!
-It makes a big difference if the Mexican player is allowed to start the first turn.
-Replay value; not sure how this one holds up over time. Revisited: indeed the appeal wears of rather quickly due to the limited amount of different strategies. The cards decide her but otherwise not many different options.
-Game favors Texans arguably, will play more and comment later on this.

The usual great htos/liberty/crusader rex system with some own twists.

Overall: great little wargame with fantastic theme and this one is of the same high quality as liberty.
A good game but hampered by limited replay value.

See review.

Have not played this the past two years.

Sold it.
jormungandr
Rating: 6
You have two scenarios where one side is trying to hold on by their fingernails while the other side hammers away at them. The constantly cycling hand mechanic is a nice innovation and the fog of war is more effective here than in some other Columbia titles, but I suspect the situation lacks replayability. That said, pulling off a win with the Texans in the 1836 scenario sure felt cool...
xatsmann
Rating: 6
Decent game once you get past the poorly laid out rules (how do the Texans get replacements?) it appears to be a good game. Its very playable and should be a good con game as you can play it a few times in one day.
DavisBrasfield
Rating: 6
Interesting game. Had trouble winning with the Texans but think it a learning issue. Wasn't excited with the game and the way it unfolded, hope it was learning issue. Will upgrade rating I think after the next game. The Mexicans sure seem strong compared to the Texans.
alhay1959
Rating: 6
Antecedent died at Goliad. Good race game
leroy43
Rating: 6
The campaign and 1835 scenarios are only ok, but the Alamo scenario is great.
ExcitingJeff
Rating: 6
Played with the original rules, which is my mistake, but those are some of the worst rules I've come across in an introductory block game.

This game also loses a point for egregious (read: any) use of Comic Sans on the board. Gross.

The game isn't without its charm, but I feel like it's a race that's tough for the Mexican player to win. It's not as bad as Crusader Rex, but it's certainly no Julius Caesar.
cannoneer
Rating: 6
Decently-fun game with a lot of back and forth. Each side has its "moment in the sun" when you think they can't lose. But overall it seems very balanced. 1835 scenario is not too compelling and really only for learning.

The one thing that made me a little leery if this title is the 'sitzkrieg' that occurs along every river line - it plays more like WWI or WWII than what I imagine the war was really like - small bands of soldiers on a massive terrain. In this game it's too easy to build a wall across the entire map - there's NO CHANCE there were enough men in the actual conflict to do this.
Bien
Rating: 5.5
Getting a sense of timing for both sides is critically important. I enjoyed the complexity of figuring the logistics, but it required quiet a bit of squinting and referencing in spots which telegraph any plans to your opponent. It reminded me a lot of the game Buffalo where the "rancher" has to cut his losses the whole game and just try to minimize the damage the buffalo do before the game is over.
kyletravels
Rating: 5.2
Great theme, interesting game play, the rule book used 8 pages when 12 were needed. The rule book issues are annoying enough that its now for trade. I don't like a modern game that in order to play correctly I have to constantly be online looking up rule explanations.
moxyoron
Rating: 5
Rules a bit of a mess..Mexicans...can they win?.
We just played and though we like it..the best way is for each player to have a go as the Mexicans and see who can do better with them (declared the winner). After a while though, this will lose interest for me.
ratbulogg
Rating: 5
another bland, forgettable, one-dimensional columbia offering, with playbalance issues. but at least it is not broken straight-from-the-box.
Defense Linguistics
Rating: 5
Have this on the table and am learning. Beautiful map. Am a Texan myself and hope the GF will become interested to learn the history of my state. She seems intrigued by the blocks.

This is a very light wargame. I think I'm unsatisfied by the scale. Not meaty enough for the price.
ScottH
Rating: 5
Pre-ordered by voting for this. This might go down as it seems very difficult for the Mexican player to make progress across the choke points on the map. With very little effort, it seemed the Texans could hold back the Mexicans. I will try again, but something seems not right here, out of the box.
SpaceButler
Rating: 5
If I could only figure out how the Mexicans can win this thing...
wkover
Rating: 5
[comments apply to the main 1836 scenario]

Texas Glory is a logistical puzzle steeped in supply capacity and hexside limits - and an interesting one, at that - but it's nothing that would be labeled as "fun" by most wargamers. It is, without a doubt, intellectually stimulating. But fun, no.

What happens is Santa Ana's army races to stake out and secure the Texan victory cities, and the Texans do what they can to get in their way. As far as I can tell, this mostly involves suicide bombing with B and C blocks, running away with A blocks, and gratuitous use of ferry blockades - every single turn, if possible. Which is to say, if the delaying action proceeds according to schedule, it's nearly combat-free. Frankly, combat is so entirely sidelined in Texas Glory that the battle rules could almost be included as an appendix, rather than embedded in the main rules text.

I do imagine that, if all three US blocks ever made an appearance (and therefore entered the game), they would have a fairly substantial combat-related effect on gameplay. But since I've never seen that happen, who knows.

For comparison's sake, in case you're wondering how Texas Glory stacks up against Columbia's other offerings, the following are what make the game unique:

Players have a starting hand of three cards, but only play (and draw) a single card per game turn. In the 1836 scenario, this means that each player only plays 12 cards over the course of the entire game.

Rather than activating groups, cards activate leaders - each of which has a one- to two-hex command radius. Consequently, a single card can sometimes activate every friendly block on the board.

Instead of using the standard three-round combat system, there are only two "real" rounds of combat, with the third round being a forced retreat/parting shot round. Also, there are no attacking combat reserves (only defensive reserves), and units can regroup into unresolved battles.

Sieges have a Cannonade option, which is clearly one of my new favorite words.

Hex supply limits are checked at the end of every turn (again, which is but a single cardplay).

The rules aren't great, but a good FAQ wiki exists to shore up the holes.

Parting words:

Many of the differences listed above are combat-related. But again, combat in this game is completely secondary. So really, you either embrace Texas Glory for its value as a wickedly procedural historical simulation, or you trade the game away. At the moment, I'm not sure where I stand - but I do feel that it's worth a few more plays.
wkover
Rating: 5
[comments apply to the main 1836 scenario]

Texas Glory is a logistical puzzle steeped in supply capacity and hexside limits - and an interesting one, at that - but it's nothing that would be labeled as "fun" by most wargamers. It is, without a doubt, intellectually stimulating. But fun, no.

In a nutshell, Santa Ana's army races to stake out and secure the Texan victory cities, and the Texans do what they can to get in their way. As far as I can tell, this mostly involves suicide bombing with B and C blocks, running away with A blocks, and gratuitous use of ferry blockades - every single turn, if possible. Which is to say, if the delaying action proceeds according to schedule, it's nearly combat-free. Frankly, combat is so entirely sidelined in Texas Glory that the battle rules could almost be included as an appendix, rather than embedded in the main rules text.

I do imagine that, if all three US blocks ever made an appearance (and therefore entered the game), they would have a fairly substantial combat-related effect on gameplay. But since I've never seen that happen, who knows.

For comparison's sake, the following are what make the game unique compared to other Columbia games:

Players have a starting hand of three cards, but only play (and draw) a single card per game turn. In the 1836 scenario, this means that each player only plays 12 cards over the course of the entire game.

Rather than activating groups, cards activate leaders - each of which has a one- to two-hex command radius. Consequently, a single card can sometimes activate every friendly block on the board.

Instead of using the standard three-round combat system, there are only two "real" rounds of combat, with the third round being a forced retreat/parting shot round. Also, there are no attacking combat reserves (only defensive reserves), and units can regroup into unresolved battles.

Sieges have a Cannonade option, which is clearly one of my new favorite words.

Hex supply limits are checked at the end of every turn (again, which is but a single cardplay).

The rules aren't great, but a good FAQ wiki exists to shore up the holes.

Parting words:

Many of the differences listed above are combat-related. But again, combat in this game is completely secondary. So really, you either embrace Texas Glory for its value as a wickedly procedural historical simulation, or you trade the game away. At the moment, I'm not sure where I stand - but I do feel that it's worth a few more plays. (Edit: Wrong. Traded away.)
alfredo lorente
Rating: 4
Interesting conflict, but the game seems to have an optimal strategy that is easy to discover . . .
Illotus
Rating: 4
Mechanically I like this, however the scenario I've played twice isn't even close to being balanced. Also the Texans have very little to do. With the Mexicans you at least have a lot to do, which distracts from the game balance.
alfredo lorente
Rating: 4
Interesting conflict, but the game seems to have an optimal strategy that is easy to discover...
campfire113
Rating: -
2P
aquabob79
Rating: -
Board has been trimmed professionally.
tima
Rating: -
box26
Stuka
Rating: -
Cambiado
(evilcore666)
alzhiel
Rating: -
2
Coffeebike
Rating: -
Based on the posted rules, seems a good compromise between Bobby Lee and the Hammer/Crusader/Liberty series.

"American Experience" Podcast 'Remember the Alamo' -http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/rss/media/alamo_01.mp3
Cosmid
Rating: -
Never played.
armadaman
Rating: -
blocks are carefully labeled
Aging One
Rating: -
Acquired March 2009.
mrtof
Rating: -
Did not like the scenarios for this game.
Helix743
Rating: -
From BGG.Con 2012
Junkyard36
Rating: -
120 min
Matt Logan
Rating: -
I haven't played this one yet. I just know that everyone should have a game with a Davey Crockett game piece. Box checked. That said, I like the punch that Columbia Games packs in such a small box AND in such a small rule set. Would love to get this to the table some day.
keoga
Rating: -
buen estado
Calxx55
Rating: -
Columbia
BradyLS
Rating: -
Had a chance to playtest on an afternoon with another player and Dan Mings (game designer) looking on. What we played was a close-run, enjoyable, 3-hour block game on a map of East Texas. Some chrome to accomodate the occupation and investiture of the Alamo and Goliad. Other rules for US intervention, the call-up of Texians, and Santa Ana's army. This was over a year ago. Things may have changed since then...
Triad1
Rating: -
not yet played
TomVeal
Rating: -
Post-Napoleonic Period > Texas War of Independence
mistermarino
Rating: -
Owned, stickered, unplayed.